Mountain Gum

Description

Common names

Mountain Gum, Broad Leaved Kindling Bark, Broad Leaved Ribbon Gum, Broad-leaved Ribbon Gum, Kindlingbark, Mountain White Gum, Seven Flowered Mountain Gum, White Gum.

Scientific names

Eucalyptus dalrympleana.

Family

Myrtaceae.

Genus

Eucalyptus.

Name origin

Dalrympleana, after Richard Dalrymple Hay, former Chief Commissioner of NSW Forests.

Rainfall

800-1900mm.

Growth rate

Fast.

Growth height

Up to 40m.

Presence in Australia

Mostly in upper reaches of catchments including Tooma, Maragle and Paddy"s River-Burra Valley.

This specie has been identified in the following Australian states: Qld, NSW, ACT, Vic, Tas, SA.

Habitat

Grassy or sclerophyll woodland or forest on loamy or sandy soils at higher elevations.

Habit

Tree to 40m high with smooth bark on lower trunk shedding in long ribbons. Large crown of glossy green leaves.

Similar species

Distinguished from Candlebark (E. rubida) mainly by its glaucous juvenile and intermediate leaves.

Site preference

Moist, well-drained deep soils. Tolerates frost.

Characteristics

Fast-growing. Develops spreading habit in open situations. Hybridises with Candlebark on Northern Tablelands.

Seed collection

Early Dec to late May. Monitor closely, as seeds released 3-8 weeks after maturity. Trees fallen for timber are ideal seed source.

Propagation

From seed (±250 viable seeds per gram).

Regeneration

From seed after fire.

Shade and shelter

Could be included in wide windbreaks as high-level cover.

Timber

Straight-grained, moderately coarse and hard, but not durable. Density about 740 kg/m3. Similar but superior to Candlebark timber. Used in framing, paneling, flooring, joinery and tool handles. Useful timber for farm forestry planting on sheltered sites.

Wildlife

Important hollow source for birds, including the Sooty Owl, and mammals, including the Yellow-bellied Glider.

Other

Leaves produce red-orange dye with alum as mordant.