Silver Bundy

Description

Common names

Silver Bundy, Large-flowered Bundy, Bundy, Long Leaved Box, Long-leaved Box, Mealy Bundy, Mearly Bundy.

Scientific names

Eucalyptus nortonii, Eucalyptus cordieri var. nortonii.

Family

Myrtaceae.

Genus

Eucalyptus.

Name origin

Unknown.

Rainfall

600-700mm.

Growth rate

Moderate.

Growth height

Up to 15m.

Presence in Australia

In most of the region except in the far west and north-west.

This specie has been identified in the following Australian states: NSW, ACT, Vic, Tas, SA.

Habitat

Open grassy or sclerophyll woodland. Dry shallow soils on sloping sites.

Habit

Trees to 15m high with fibrous flaky grey bark with whitish patches, shedding in short ribbons above. Narrow green adult leaves.

Similar species

Long-leaf Box and Silver Bundy are virtually identical except that Silver Bundy has glaucous (white-waxy) buds, fruit and branchlets whereas Long-leaf Box does not. Both are distinguished from Apple Box (E. bridgesiana) by their larger fruits and buds.

Site preference

Infertile soil on dry and rocky areas. Tolerates drought and moderate frost.

Characteristics

Moderate growth rate. Foliage high in cineole, useful in medicine.

Flowering

White-cream, Mar-May.

Seed collection

Throughout year, particularly summer-autumn. Seeds generally retained.

Propagation

From seed (±127 viable seeds per gram). 250C is optimum germination temperature.

Regeneration

From seed, particularly in absence of competitive exotic grasses or weeds, and during wet summers. Often regenerates on infertile sites due to lack of weed competition. Establishes very well when direct seeded.

Shade and shelter

Useful medium-level cover in windbreaks. Useful shade due to dense canopy and suitability for harsh exposed hilltops.

Land protection

Useful for revegetating unproductive, rocky recharge hills.

Fuel

Fair. Easily split and burns fast.

Timber

Little value. Timber yellow-grey, coarse-grained and not durable. Sapwood decays rapidly.

Wildlife

Excellent habitat. Foliage is koala forage. Nectar-feeding birds attracted to flowers, which are pollen-rich. Insect-eating birds such as thornbills find insects amongst foliage. White-throated Treecreepers and sittellas glean bark. Fruits and seeds eaten by native birds, particularly parrots. Hollows are nesting and refuge sites for native birds and mammals.

Ornamental

Juvenile foliage particularly attractive.

Other

Leaves produce range of dyes depending on mordants used.