Currawang

Description

Common names

Currawang, Spearwood, Lancewood, Myall.

Scientific names

Acacia doratoxylon.

Family

Mimosaceae.

Genus

Acacia.

Name origin

From Greek doratos, spear, and xylon, wood, because the Kooris made spears from the wood.

Rainfall

300mm.

Growth rate

Slow.

Growth height

3-8m.

Presence in Australia

Rocky outcrops of the following areas Urana-Rand-Corowa; Narrandera-Morundah-Galore-Collingullie; Burrumbuttock-West Hume; Bowna-Jindera; Walla Walla; Yambla; Holbrook; Upper Back & Upper Jerra Jerra; Ten Mile; The Rock-Henty-Milbrulong; Brookong; Upper Sandy; Buckargingah; Burkes-Graveyard; Lower Kyeamba & Main; O"Briens South & McLeods; Upper Kyeamba and Keajura.

This specie has been identified in the following Australian states: Qld, NSW, ACT, Vic, SA, NT, WA.

Habitat

Eucalypt and Callitris woodland on rocky ridges and mallee on red sand.

Habit

Erect or spreading tree or shrub, 3-8m high. Dense crown of olive-green narrow "leaves".

Site preference

Well-drained soil in open situations. Frost and drought tolerant. Semi-shade to full sun.

Characteristics

Stock occasionally eat the foliage. Slow-growing but long-lived.

Flowering

Bright yellow, usually Aug-Nov.

Seed collection

Early Dec-late Jan. Monitor closely, as seeds dropped soon after maturity.

Propagation

From scarified seed (±100 viable seeds per gram). Pour boiling or very hot water over seed and soak for several hours before drying and sowing.

Regeneration

From seed, particularly after fire.

Shade and shelter

Useful low-level cover in windbreaks.

Land protection

Good growth in rocky erodible soil and on recharge areas. Legume, improves soil fertility through "fixing" nitrogen.

Fuel

Excellent, produces a hot fire.

Timber

Dark brown, very hard and heavy. Pleasantly perfumed when freshly cut. Resembles Blackwood (A. melanoxylon) timber, but is heavier and less-grained. Tends to split, but still valuable for furniture.

Wildlife

Good habitat. Provides pollen for native moths, butterflies and other insects, which attract insect-eating birds. Appears to be the most prolific pollen producer of all wattles. Birds including parrots and native pigeons eat seeds.

Koori

Spears reputedly made from the wood.

Ornamental

Attractive specimen for gardens.