Sloane’s Citizen Science Monitoring Program

Sloane’s Citizen Science Monitoring Program

Sloanes froglet

Sloane’s froglet (Crinia sloanei) is a tiny threatened frog restricted in NSW to only a few locations along the Murray River. One of the largest populations is found in Albury’s Thurgoona-Wirlinga region.

The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and Woolshed Thurgoona Landcare Group are coordinating a community-based Sloane's froglet survey and monitoring program. We are asking community members to help us survey and monitor Sloane's froglet. The data you collect will help us to plan and prioritise conservation work for this tiny frog to secure its long-term future in Thurgoona-Wirlinga.

How do I survey for Sloane's froglet

Surveying for Sloane's froglet involves listening for calling males at their wetland breeding habitat, and then entering the survey results into the Sloanes Champions BioCollect Portal https://biocollect.ala.org.au/acsa/project . If Sloane's froglets are present at a wetland, they are usually heard right away. However, sometimes they stop calling for a while, or other factors may influence our ability to hear them, so it is best to listen for calling males for a minimum of five minutes. If calling males are present, the number of males should be estimated and assigned to a relative abundance category (also recorded in BioCollect). It is often beneficial to survey a wetland more than once during the main survey period (July and August), particularly if the first survey did not detect Sloane's froglet.

Resources

Frogs found around Thurgoona

Plains tree frog - Litoria paraewingi

Plains_Tree_FrogDescription


A medium-sized tree frog (35–45 mm). The dorsal colour is typically a light cream or brown, with a broad darker brown band that runs down the back and is divided by a paler stripe running directly down the backbone. The belly is white or cream. A broad dark stripe runs along the side of the head from the snout, through the eye, to over the shoulder. The back of the thighs and groin are a bright yellow to orange/red colour. The toes are half-webbed. The toe-pads are wider than the toes.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Plains tree frogs occur in forests, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. They breed in farm dams, natural wetlands, streams and roadside ditches. Males primarily call during winter from vegetation overhanging the water, from the bank, or from floating vegetation. Eggs are attached in clusters to submerged sticks and vegetation in still water.

Peron’s tree frog - Litoria peronii

Perons Tree FrogDescription

Sometimes also known as the maniacal cackle frog because of its distinctive call. A medium- to large-sized tree frog (45–65 mm). The dorsal colour is variable, ranging from light grey to dark brown, often with darker blotches. The back is covered in fine emerald green flecks. The eye has a vertical stripe that, in combination with the horizontal pupil, gives the appearance of a cross-shaped pupil. The armpits, groin, and backs of thighs have bold yellow and black marbling. The toes are half webbed and toe-pads are large.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Peron’s tree frogs occur in forests, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. They breed in farm dams, natural wetlands, and slow sections of streams. Males typically call from mid spring to summer. They call from vegetation or logs either within or overhanging the water. Eggs are laid singularly or in small groups among leaf litter and vegetation.

Plains froglet - Crinia parinsignifera

Plains FrogletDescription

A small frog (20–30 mm) that is common throughout the central and southern tablelands and adjacent slopes. The dorsal skin has raised warts and ridges, which are mottled with colours ranging from light cream through to dark brown. The belly is typically grey with darker flecks. The toes lack webbing.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Plains froglets occur in forests, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. The species breeds in a large range of water body types, from large permanent wetlands, flowing rivers, to small puddles. Males call from early winter through to late spring. Males may call from open sites, from within vegetation, or from submerged vegetation. Eggs are typically scattered singularly on the substrate, but may also be attached to submerged vegetation.

 

Common eastern froglet - Crinia signifera

Common Eastern FrogletDescription

A small frog (20–25 mm) that is common throughout the region covered by this guide. The dorsal colour and texture is highly variable, ranging from smooth with a uniform colour to raised warts and ridges with contrasting stripes and mottles of light cream through to dark brown. The belly is typically granular and is mottled with white and light and dark grey. The toes lack webbing.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Common eastern froglets occur in forests, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. The species breeds in a large range of water body types, from large permanent wetlands and flowing rivers, to small puddles. Males call predominately through winter and spring. Males may call from open sites, from within vegetation, or from submerged vegetation. Eggs are typically scattered singularly on the substrate, but may also be attached to submerged vegetation.

Sloane’s froglet - Crinia sloanei

Description

A small frog (15–25 mm) that occurs on the western edge of the slopes region. The dorsal skin has raised warts and ridges, which are mottled with colours ranging from light cream through to dark brown and olive. Raised warts are often capped with orange. The belly is typically grey with darker flecks. The toes lack webbing.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Sloane’s froglets occur in forests, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. The species breeds in a large range of water body types, from large permanent wetlands to small puddles, primarily in areas that become inundated with winter rainfall. Males typically call from submerged vegetation through winter. Clusters of single eggs are typically attached to submerged vegetation.

Eastern banjo frog - Limnodynastes dumerilii

Eastern Banjo FrogDescription

Also known as the pobblebonk frog. A large burrowing frog (55–85 mm) that occurs throughout the NSW tablelands and western slopes region. Two subspecies are recognised in the tablelands region: L. dumerilii dumerilii, which occurs at altitudes below 1000 metres, and L. dumerilii fryi, which occurs at higher altitudes in the Snowy Mountains. The dorsal colour can be variable, ranging from grey to dark brown or olive green. Most individuals have irregular dark markings on the back, and some individuals have a stripe down the middle of the back. A raised, prominent pale stripe runs from below the eye to above the arm. The back is moderately warty, and the belly is smooth. The toes are one-quarter webbed. A prominent raised gland is present on the lower leg.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Eastern banjo frogs occur in woodlands, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. The species breeds in large permanent dams and wetlands, and streams. Male typically call through spring. Males usually call from the water among emergent vegetation or other debris. Eggs are laid in a large floating foamy mass.

Giant banjo frog - Limnodynastes interioris

Giant Banjo FrogDescription

Also known as the giant pobblebonk frog. A large burrowing frog (65–90 mm) that occurs along the western edge of the NSW slopes region. The dorsal colour is typically a pale brown, yellow and orange, with a yellow belly. Most individuals have irregular dark markings on the back. A raised, prominent orange stripe runs from below the eye to above the arm. The back is moderately warty, and the belly is smooth. The toes are one-quarter webbed. A prominent raised orange gland is present on the lower leg.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Giant banjo frogs occur in woodlands, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. They breed in large permanent dams and wetlands, and also streams. Males predominately call through spring. Males usually call from the water among emergent vegetation or other debris. Eggs are laid in a large floating foamy mass.

Striped marsh frog - Limnodynastes peronei

Striped Marsh FrogDescription

A medium-sized frog (40– 50 mm) that has a patchy distribution throughout the NSW tablelands and western slopes region. The dorsal colour is typically a light grey-brown with darker longitudinal stripes, and sometimes a paler stripe running down the back. The belly is white and the skin is smooth. The toes have very little webbing.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Striped marsh frogs occur in woodlands, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. The species breeds in large permanent dams and wetlands, and also in smaller pools that typically dry. Calling is usually through the warmer months after rain, and males usually call from the water among emergent vegetation or other debris. Eggs are laid in a large floating foamy mass.

Spotted grass frog - Limnodynastes tasmaniensis

Description

A small- to medium-sized frog (35–45 mm) that occurs throughout the NSW tablelands and western slopes region. The dorsal colour can be highly variable, with irregular spots and blotches of brown or green. Some individuals have a stripe running down the back that varies from white to red. Irregular orange to red markings may be present on other parts of the body. The belly is white and the skin is smooth. The toes have very little webbing.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Spotted grass frogs occur in woodlands, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. The species breeds in a large variety of wetlands, from large permanent dams to small roadside puddles. Calling is usually from late winter through spring. Males usually call from the water among emergent vegetation or other debris. Eggs are laid in a large floating foamy mass.

Common spadefoot frog - Neobatrachus sudelli

Common Spadefoot FrogDescription

Also known as Sudell’s frog. A medium-sized burrowing frog (35–50 mm) that occurs throughout the lower slopes and inland areas, extending to drier parts of the tablelands. The dorsal colour pattern consists of a fine to coarse patterning of lighter and darker yellows, browns, greys and olive greens. Its back typically has low warts, and the belly is smooth and white. The pupil is vertical, toes are webbed, and the underside of the feet have a distinctive black metatarsal tubercle (a hard skin fold under the foot).

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Common spadefoot frogs occur in woodlands, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pastures. The species breeds in large permanent dams and wetlands, and also small ephemeral ponds. Calling is usually through late winter and spring. Males usually call from open water. Eggs are laid in long jelly strings that initially float near the surface, or are wrapped around vegetation.

Bibron’s toadlet - Pseudophryne bibronii

Bibrons ToadletDescription

A small terrestrial frog (25–35 mm) that occurs across much of south-eastern Australia. The dorsal colour varies from brown to light or dark grey, typically with darker flecks and sometimes orange capped warts. The back is typically covered in low warts. A bright yellow or orange patch is often present on the vent and base of the arms. The belly is smooth or slightly granular, and is marked with bold black and white mottling. The toes lack webbing. The species typically crawls rather than hops.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Bibron’s toadlet occurs in forests, heathlands and grasslands, and often in areas that have been highly modified. Breeding habitat includes ephemeral pools and seepage lines that are typically dry during the breeding season. Males call from terrestrial nests in autumn, in vegetation and soil around areas that will flood following major rain events. The eggs are deposited in these terrestrial nests where they develop through to hatching stage. When their nests flood the eggs are stimulated to hatch and the tadpoles can move into the main pool.

Smooth toadlet - Uperoleia laevigate

Smooth ToadletDescription

A small terrestrial frog (25–35 mm). The dorsal colour is typically a light brown or grey colour with darker blotches and patterns. A prominent pale triangular patch is usually present on top of the head. The groin and back of the thighs are a bright orange or red colour. The skin on the back is granular, and the belly is smooth with a light background and darker flecks and patterns. The toes lack webbing.

Breeding habitat and behaviour

Smooth toadlets occur in forests, woodlands, heathlands, grasslands and cleared pasture areas. Breeding habitat typically includes large dams with grassy areas that become inundated after heavy rain. Males call from the land or in the water during spring through to autumn depending on rainfall. Clusters of single eggs are deposited on submerged vegetation or other debris

Seasonal Information

Frogs

Main Calling period

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Bibron’s toadlet (Pseudophryne bibroni )

                       
Plains tree frog (Litoria paraewingi)

                       
Plains froglet (Crinia parinsignifera )                        
Common eastern froglet (Crinia signifera )                        
Sloane’s froglet (Crinia sloanei )                        
Common spadefoot frog (Neobatrachus sudelli )                        
Spotted grass frog (Limnodynastes tasmaniensis )                        
Eastern banjo frog (Limnodynastes dumerilii )                        
Giant banjo frog (Limnodynastes interioris )                        
Striped marsh frog (Limnodynastes peroni )                        
Smooth toadlet (Uperoleia laevigata )                        
Peron’s tree frog (Litoria peroni )